Category Guides

Bow legs
Guides

Bow legs

About bow legs in babies and children Bow legs happen when the bones in each of a baby's thighs and legs line up differently while the baby is growing. Most children aged 18 months to 2 years have some bow-leggedness. It's more common in babies of above-average weight. Bow legs are sometimes more noticeable when children start to walk.

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Guides

Cradle cap

Causes of cradle cap Cradle cap happens if your baby's skin makes too much oil (sebum). This extra oil interferes with the natural shedding of skin on his scalp and creates a build-up of dead skin over the scalp. Your baby's skin probably makes the extra oil because mum's hormones are still circulating in his bloodstream after birth.
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Guides

Development coordination disorder (DCD)

About development coordination disorder (DCD) Development coordination disorder (DCD) is a developmental disorder that causes problems with movement and coordination. Children with DCD can find it hard to coordinate their bodies to do everyday tasks, like dressing themselves, writing neatly, running or riding a bike.
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Developmental delay

About developmental delay When young children are slower to develop physical, emotional, social and communication skills than expected, it's called developmental delay. Developmental delay can show up in the way children move, communicate, think and learn, or behave with others. When more than one of these areas is affected, it might be called global developmental delay.
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Guides

Cellulitis

Causes of cellulitis Cellulitis is caused by bacteria, usually Streptococcus pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus . The infection begins where the skin is damaged or inflamed and then can spread through the skin layers. The bacteria that cause cellulitis might live on the skin, and get into the skin layers through a break in the skin.
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Guides

Congenital heart disease

About congenital heart disease Children with congenital heart disease are born with defects in the structure of their hearts . The defects happen very early in pregnancy, when the heart is being formed. There are many different types of heart defect. The most common type is a hole in the heart . The hole might be between the top chambers of the heart, or between the bottom chambers.
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Guides

Constipation

Causes of constipation in children Constipation can happen for several reasons. Your child might be holding poos in because he's too busy playing, because it hurts to do a poo (or has hurt before), or because he doesn't want to use the toilets at his preschool or school. Constipation might also happen if your child isn't eating enough fibre, or because of an illness that has made your child eat and drink less.
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Guides

Ear tugging

About ear pulling or ear tugging in children If your baby or young child is pulling at her ears, it might be a sign that she's tired or that her ears are blocked with ear wax. Ear pulling or tugging can also sometimes be a sign of a middle ear infection or external ear infection. Teething is often blamed for ear pulling, but it isn't clear whether there's a link between teething and pulling.
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Guides

Eczema

Causes of eczema Eczema has a genetic basis - this means it tends to run in families. Children with eczema often have other allergy-type conditions like asthma or hay fever. Eczema might flare up: after contact with irritating chemicals like soaps or bubble baths, or irritating fabrics like wool and polyester after viral or bacterial infections after exposure to substances like dust mites or animal fur after exposure to foods that your child is allergic to when your child gets too hot when your child is stressed.
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Dietitian

What is a dietitian? A dietitian has qualifications and skills to give you expert nutrition and dietary advice. Dietitians work in many areas including private practice, community and public health, hospitals and nursing homes, food industry, government, research and teaching. The Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) recommends looking for the Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) credential when you're choosing a dietitian.
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Guides

Dry skin

Causes of dry skin Many babies have dry, peeling skin immediately after birth , particularly if they're born after 40 weeks. This is normal and gets better quickly. Bathing too often and using soap can cause dry skin, or make skin worse if it's already dry. This is because soap removes the skin's natural oils and makes it harder for your child's skin to keep moisture in.
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Endocrinologist

About endocrinologists An endocrinologist is a medical doctor with special training and skills in disorders that involve the endocrine system. The endocrine system is a complex group of organs - called endocrine glands - that make hormones and pass them into the bloodstream. The glands in the endocrine system include the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenals, ovaries, testes and pancreas.
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Guides

Dehydration

What is dehydration? If your child loses a lot of body fluids or isn't drinking enough, he might get dehydrated. Gastroenteritis is the most common cause of dehydration. This is because it can make your child lose a lot of body fluids quickly. Any illness with persistent diarrhoea, vomiting or reduced fluid intake can result in dehydration.
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Guides

Epilepsy and seizures

What is epilepsy? Epilepsy is the name for a range of brain conditions where a child has or is at risk of having repeated and unpredictable seizures because of abnormal electrical activity in the brain . This abnormal activity can change a child's awareness, behaviour, body movements or senses. If a child has one seizure, it doesn't always mean she has epilepsy.
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Guides

Diarrhoea

What is diarrhoea? Diarrhoea is large, runny, frequent or watery poo. It's common in children. Diarrhoea can be: short term - it usually passes in a day or two and lasts no more than two weeks persistent - it lasts 2-4 weeks chronic - it lasts longer than four weeks. Symptoms of diarrhoea If your child has diarrhoea, he'll have large, runny, frequent or watery poo.
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Guides

Faecal incontinence

Causes of faecal incontinence A common cause of faecal incontinence in children is chronic constipation. If your child has been constipated for a long time, poo builds up in his rectum, which can cause the rectum to stretch. Your child might lose the urge to go the toilet because his rectum always feels stretched.
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Guides

Erythema toxicum

Causes of erythema toxicum We don't know what causes erythema toxicum, but we do know that it isn't caused by an infection . Symptoms of erythema toxicum The erythema toxicum rash usually comes up 1-3 days after birth. The erythema toxicum rash looks like a combination of flat, red patches, tiny red bumps and pus-filled bumps .
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Guides

Febrile convulsions

What is a febrile convulsion? A febrile convulsion is a seizure or fit that happens because of fever, which is a temperature higher than 38°C. The rapid rise in temperature causes an abnormal electrical discharge in the brain. Febrile convulsions usually happen in children between six months and six years old .
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Guides

Ear wax

About ear wax in children Ear wax has an important job. It's a filter for your child's ear, protecting the ear canal from water, infection, trauma and foreign objects. Ear wax comes from glands in the ear canal. The ear canal's lining constantly renews itself. Along with chewing and talking, this process of renewal usually moves wax out of the ear.
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Guides

Bulimia nervosa

What is bulimia nervosa? Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder and a mental health condition. Signs and symptoms of bulimia nervosa People with bulimia nervosa are often close to a normal body weight or even overweight. And it's common for them to try to keep their condition a secret. This means that bulimia nervosa can be hard to spot .
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Guides

External ear infection

About external ear infection or otitis externa If your child has an external ear infection, the lining of her ear canal on the outer side of her eardrum is infected. Children who swim a lot often get external ear infections. This is because water stays in their ears after swimming and causes irritation.
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