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More Than Words®
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More Than Words®

What is More Than Words®? More Than Words® is a family-centred, group-based training program. It focuses on training parents to help children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) develop communication skills. The program is one of several developed at the Hanen Centre in Canada. You can also get the program in Australia.

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Self-identity and self-esteem for teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

Self-identity and self-esteem for teenagers with autism spectrum disorder: what to expect Teenagers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can find it harder than typically developing teenagers to work out who they are and what their values are. They might also find it difficult to build self-esteem - that is, seeing themselves as valuable members of society with skills and strengths.
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Personal hygiene and teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

Personal hygiene and your child with autism spectrum disorder When your teenage child was younger, you taught her the basics of good hygiene - how to clean her teeth, have a shower or bath, wash and brush her hair, blow her nose and wash her hands. In adolescence, your child's changing body means that his personal hygiene routines need to change.
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Mood changes: teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

Moods and autism spectrum disorder: what to expect Ups and downs are a normal part of life for all young people. But teenagers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can have more frequent or more severe mood changes than typically developing teenagers. It might sometimes be hard for you to work out whether your child's behaviour is happening because she's a teenager or because she has ASD.
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Everyday skills for children with autism spectrum disorder

Helping your child with autism spectrum disorder learn how to do everyday tasks Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often have difficulty managing everyday tasks like getting dressed, brushing teeth, packing school bags and setting the table. Tasks like these need the ability to plan and stay on task without getting distracted or needing reminders.
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Low mood and depression: teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

Autism spectrum disorder, low mood and depression: what to expect Teenagers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a greater risk of low mood and depression than their typically developing peers. This is because teenagers with ASD might: realise for the first time that they're 'different' from their peers find it hard to cope with increasing academic pressure and expectations find it hard to understand social rules and expectations, make friends and fit in socially.
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Emotional development in children with autism spectrum disorder

Emotions and typical development Humans have six basic emotions - happiness, surprise, sadness, anger, fear and disgust. We also experience more complex feelings like embarrassment, shame, pride, guilt, envy, joy, trust, interest, contempt and anticipation. The ability to understand and express these emotions starts developing from birth .
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Family relationships and autism spectrum disorder

Building family relationships when you have a child with autism spectrum disorder If you're raising a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), taking care of your family relationships is as important as taking care of any other aspect of your family life. You can strengthen your family relationships and quality of life by: focusing on relationships within your family focusing on your family strengths building your family's resilience.
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Social skills for teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

Social relationships and teenagers with autism spectrum disorder For your teenage child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there are lots of upsides to having healthy relationships with peers. They can boost your child's self-esteem and sense of belonging. Friendships and social relationships also give your child experience in managing emotions, responding to other people's feelings, negotiating, cooperating and problem-solving.
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My child has autism spectrum disorder: what does the future hold?

Your child has just been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder: what to expect With consistent, evidence-based interventions, you're likely to see improvement in your child's behaviour, language and social interactions . But each child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) behaves differently, so each child will respond to interventions and therapy differently too.
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Vaccinations and autism spectrum disorder

Autism spectrum disorder and childhood vaccinations: in a nutshell We don't know exactly what causes autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but there are many theories. Many of these theories are unproven, with little or no scientific evidence behind them. One of these unproven theories is that ASD is caused by childhood vaccinations, specifically the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) immunisation.
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DSM-5: autism spectrum disorder diagnosis

About the DSM and autism spectrum disorder diagnosis When diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), professionals like paediatricians, psychiatrists, psychologists and speech pathologists use the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th edition), or DSM-5, produced by the American Psychiatric Association.
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Sexuality and relationships: teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

Sexuality and sexual development Sexuality is more than sex. It's also the way your child feels about his developing body. It's how he understands feelings of intimacy, attraction and affection for others, and how he develops and maintains respectful relationships. Sexuality is essential to healthy overall development.
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Preparing for puberty: children with autism spectrum disorder

When to start preparing children with autism spectrum disorder for puberty Most parents wonder when to start talking about puberty with their children. You might be worried that you'll confuse your child with information that he doesn't need yet. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often need more time than typically developing children to adjust to and understand changes in their lives.
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Anxiety: children and teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

Anxiety or autism spectrum disorder? Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) feel many of the same worries and fears as other children. But when children and teenagers with ASD get worried or anxious, the way they show their anxiety can look a lot like common characteristics of ASD - stimming, obsessive and ritualistic behaviour and resistance to changes in routine.
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Thinking and learning strengths in children with autism spectrum disorder

Thinking and learning strengths in children with autism spectrum disorder Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are often described in terms of their difficulties, deficits and challenges. But children with ASD also have many strengths and abilities . These might be strengths when compared to typically developing children, or individual strengths within your child's own set of skills.
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How autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed

Autism diagnosis: what to expect There's no single test for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Instead, autism diagnosis is based on: watching how your child plays and interacts with others - that is, how your child is developing now interviewing you reviewing your child's developmental history - that is, how your child has developed in the past.
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The National Disability Insurance Scheme and HCWA: FAQs

What is the NDIS? The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is a single, national scheme that funds reasonable and necessary support to help Australians with disability reach goals throughout life. If your child has a significant and permanent disability or developmental delay, the NDIS supports your child and the people who care for your child.
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Late autism spectrum disorder diagnosis: older children and teenagers

Why some children get a late autism diagnosis Many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are diagnosed in early childhood. But for others, the signs might not be as clear. It might not be until they're at primary school or even secondary school that the question of ASD comes up. During these years, social and behavioural differences can become more obvious as children respond to the social and educational challenges of school and friendships.
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Worried about autism spectrum disorder? What to do

1. Make an appointment with a health professional If you think your child has autism spectrum disorder (ASD), it's good to act quickly and make an appointment with a professional. For example, you could talk to your child and family health nurse, your GP or a paediatrician. If the professional doesn't have any concerns about your child, but you're still worried, it's OK to ask for a second opinion from another doctor.
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