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Social and recreational activities for teenagers with autism spectrum disorder
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Social and recreational activities for teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

Why social and recreational activities are important for teenagers with autism spectrum disorder Teenagers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are just as interested in recreational and social activities as typically developing teenagers. They get just as much pleasure from these activities too. Organised social and recreational activities with other young people give teenagers with ASD the chance to pursue special interests or things they're good at.

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How autism spectrum disorder affects learning and development

Autism spectrum disorder: how it affects development Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) develop at a different rate and don't necessarily develop skills in the same order as typically developing children. For example, a child with ASD might start to use a few single words around 12 months of age.
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Early signs of autism spectrum disorder

Autism spectrum disorder and early development Children all develop at different rates. Health professionals like GPs and child and family health nurses check children's development by looking at whether children are achieving various important milestones. These can be physical, emotional, social, linguistic or behavioural milestones.
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Early Days workshops for parents

Early Days workshops are for mothers, fathers and other family carers of children aged six years or younger who have recently been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or who are going through the ASD assessment process. About Early Days workshops Early Days is a series of free, online and face-to-face workshops for parents and other family carers of children aged six years or younger who've recently been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or who are going through the ASD assessment process.
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Early intervention and the National Disability Insurance Scheme

What is early intervention? Early intervention means doing things as soon as possible to work on your child's developmental and support needs. Starting intervention early is the best way to support the development and wellbeing of children with disability or developmental delay. It can help children develop the skills they need to take part in everyday activities.
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The NDIS support pathway: Sam's story

Sam's story of NDIS support Sam is 2½ years old. Sam's parents are worried about some of his behaviour at home and in public. For example, Sam often gets very upset in the trolley at the supermarket if his mother touches him on the arm to stop him from grabbing things. He also gets upset at child care when other children or staff members touch him or brush past him.
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Sleep problems: children with autism spectrum disorder

Autism spectrum disorder and sleep Like all children, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can have trouble getting to sleep and staying asleep. Children with ASD can also have sleep problems that we don't see as often in other children. These difficulties include: irregular sleeping and waking patterns - for example, lying awake until very late or waking very early in the morning sleeping much less than expected for their age, or being awake for more than an hour during the night getting up and playing or making noise for one or more hours during the night excessive sleepiness during the day.
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Toilet training: children with autism spectrum disorder

Signs that children with autism spectrum disorder are ready for toilet training Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) generally show the same signs of readiness for toilet training as typically developing children do. But these signs might appear when your child is older, and the training might take longer .
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Choosing primary schools for children with autism spectrum disorder

Primary school options for children with autism spectrum disorder All children in Australia over the age of six have to go to school, and your child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) might have a range of primary school options. Mainstream schools Many children with ASD go to mainstream primary schools - that is, regular public and private schools for typically developing children.
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Signs of autism spectrum disorder in older children and teenagers

Signs of autism spectrum disorder Some of the main social communication and behaviour signs of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in middle childhood and adolescence are listed below. These signs often become noticeable when a child reaches school age and has difficulty adjusting to new social situations in a school environment - for example, following and taking part in conversations appropriately, making friends, and having age-appropriate interests.
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Secondary school transitions: teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

Secondary school transition needs for children with autism spectrum disorder Transitions of any kind can be difficult for children and teenagers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Starting at secondary school is a big change for any child, and particularly for children with ASD. To make things easier for your child, the transition will need careful planning and might need to happen in stages .
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Paying attention: children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

About attention When we pay attention, we focus on one thing and put other things out of our minds. For example, we listen to what someone is saying while ignoring other conversations and background noise in the room. Paying attention uses particular networks in the brain. It's a skill that develops over time.
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Structured play: new skills for children with autism spectrum disorder

How autism spectrum disorder can affect play Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) enjoy playing, but they can find some types of play difficult. It's common for them to have very limited play, play with only a few toys, or play in a repetitive way. For example, your child might like spinning the wheels on a car and watching the wheels rotate, or might do a puzzle in the same order every time.
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Play and children with autism spectrum disorder

How autism spectrum disorder can affect play Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) enjoy playing, but they can find some types of play difficult. It's common for them to have very limited play, play with only a few toys, or play in a repetitive way. For example, your child might like spinning the wheels on a car and watching the wheels rotate, or might complete a puzzle in the same order every time.
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Being an advocate for your child with additional needs

Being an advocate: what does it mean? Advocacy is promoting and defending a person's rights, needs and interests. Many people can speak up for their own rights, needs and interests, but some find it hard. Children with additional needs often struggle to speak up for themselves, or don't have the ability to do it.
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Communication with school: teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

How good communication supports your child with autism spectrum disorder When your child has autism spectrum disorder (ASD), good communication between you and your child's school and staff is especially important. It's part of creating a shared understanding of your goals, your child's goals and his specific needs .
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Choosing secondary schools for children with autism spectrum disorder

Secondary school options for children with autism spectrum disorder There are different secondary school options in Australia. They include: government schools, also called public or state schools private schools, which include religious and independent schools home-schooling and distance education. There are also some schools that cater specifically for children and teenagers with additional needs .
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Causes of autism spectrum disorder

What causes autism spectrum disorder? We don't know exactly what causes autism spectrum disorder (ASD). There might be several causes, including brain development and genetic factors. We do know that ASD isn't caused by anything that parents do or don't do while raising their child. Brain development and autism spectrum disorder In children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the brain develops differently from typically developing children.
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