Category Pregnancy

Birth classes: what they are and why they're good
Pregnancy

Birth classes: what they are and why they're good

What to expect from birth classes Birth classes give detailed information about labour, birth, pain relief choices and ways to support your partner during birth. Many classes include information about parenting in the first few months, settling your baby and breastfeeding. Even if you've done research online or talked to other expectant dads, at birth classes you can ask questions, clear up conflicting advice, and get specific information about the place where your baby will be born.

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Pregnancy

Vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC)

What is a VBAC? Women who have had a caesarean birth are usually able to safely try vaginal birth next time around. This is commonly called vaginal birth after caesarean or VBAC . A VBAC is generally the same as any other vaginal birth. But one big difference is that when you go into labour, midwives and doctors will monitor you very closely - more closely than if you hadn't had a previous caesarean.
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Pregnancy

Pregnancy, sex drive and your relationship: for women

Your sex drive during pregnancy When you're pregnant, it's normal for your sex drive to be higher or lower than before. This can be because of changes in your body, hormones, mood and energy levels. These changes are natural and every pregnancy is different. Most couples, including both heterosexual and same-sex couples, have less sex when they're expecting a baby.
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Pregnancy

Working while pregnant: tips

Working while pregnant: tips for managing pregnancy symptoms Working while pregnant - especially during the early months - can be tricky if you're going through morning sickness and feeling really tired . There are three key things you can do to manage these symptoms: Eat small, regular, healthy meals and snacks.
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Pregnancy

Birth Choices: your guide to pregnancy and birth care

Birth Choices - all you need to know to compare pregnancy care and giving birth in Australian public hospitals, private hospitals, birth centres or at home. For each birth setting, you can also see the carers who will look after you during pregnancy, birth and after your baby is born. And you can enter your due date to look at your pregnancy week by week, follow the changes in yourself and your baby, and keep up with appointments and tests.
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Pregnancy

Pregnancy: an overview

Pregnancy care: getting started If you've just found out or think that you're pregnant, see your GP straight away to start your pregnancy care. Your GP will: confirm that you're pregnant organise routine tests, including a blood test check your health talk with you about pregnancy care options refer you to the health professionals you want to care for you or the place you want to give birth.
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Pregnancy

11 weeks pregnant

You at 11 weeks pregnant Many women find that morning sickness starts to settle down after this point in pregnancy. You might be having leg or foot cramps - this is common. Make sure you get lots of calcium by eating calcium-rich foods like milk, cheese and yoghurt, and stay active. If you have special dietary needs, seeing a dietitian might be a good idea.
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Pregnancy

Women and sex during pregnancy

What to expect from sex during pregnancy Sex during pregnancy can feel different from how it felt before you were pregnant. When you're pregnant, hormones and extra blood flow to your genitals can make sex more enjoyable. But symptoms like sore breasts and nausea, as well as your growing belly, can also make sex uncomfortable.
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Pregnancy

16 weeks pregnant

You at 16 weeks Some women start feeling their baby's movements now. The feeling is often described as being like butterflies in your tummy. Don't worry if you're not feeling anything , though. Many women having their first baby don't feel movements until somewhere between 18 and 22 weeks. But some women having their second or third baby might feel movements earlier.
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Pregnancy

12 weeks pregnant

You at 12 weeks pregnant Your uterus shifts upwards about now, so the pressure on your bladder won't be so bad. For a little while at least, you probably won't need to go to the toilet so often. Many women start feeling a little less tired now . Others still feel very low on energy. You might notice brown patches on your face or neck .
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Pregnancy

Pregnancy and work: women's rights and entitlements

Pregnancy and work: your rights If you're employed in Australia, the law protects you against discrimination. According to the Sex Discrimination Act 1984, the Fair Work Act 2009 and other state and territory laws, you can't be treated unfairly because you're pregnant . For example, you can't be dismissed ('sacked'), made to work fewer hours, given less important work or overlooked for promotion or training.
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Pregnancy

17 weeks pregnant

You at 17 weeks pregnant You could have more vaginal discharge, so sanitary pads or panty liners could come in handy. If the discharge changes colour or smells bad, see your midwife or doctor. You might have lots of energy. People are probably starting to notice that you're pregnant. It could be time to shop for pregnancy bras and maternity clothes or loose clothes.
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Pregnancy

8 weeks pregnant

You at 8 weeks pregnant Your uterus is about the size of a tennis ball. It's putting pressure on your bladder, so you might be feeling the need to go to the toilet more often. Your body is zinging with hormones to help your baby grow. Nausea peaks around this time, so you might feel quite sick. You might also feel more emotional, and you could be happy or grumpy at a moment's notice.
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Pregnancy

7 weeks pregnant

You at 7 weeks pregnant At this stage, some women have glowing skin. Others experience skin problems, such as pimples. There's not much you can do about this, except cleanse your face regularly, use as little make-up as possible and stick to eating healthy foods and drinking lots of water. Your breasts might be tender, and your nipples browner and more bumpy.
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Pregnancy

14 weeks pregnant

You at 14 weeks pregnant Many women find that this is the most comfortable and energetic time of their pregnancies. Morning sickness usually eases off now. Your baby bump is likely to 'pop out' any time now. Your breasts are starting to make colostrum. You might notice small skin 'tags', which often appear underneath the breasts.
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Pregnancy

6 weeks pregnant

You at 6 weeks pregnant Your sense of smell might be stronger, and ordinary smells might make you feel sick . It's the same with your appetite and sense of taste. Watch out for dizzy spells - if you're feeling faint, make sure you sit down. And if you have any bleeding or cramping, call your doctor or midwife.
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Pregnancy

9 weeks pregnant

You at 9 weeks pregnant Most women will start to put on some weight at this stage, which is normal. But most still won't have a noticeable baby bump. Headaches are common. You can take paracetamol according to the instructions on the packet. Also, nausea peaks around this time. Talk with your health professional if there are problems or changes that are really bothering you.
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Pregnancy

18 weeks pregnant

You at 18 weeks pregnant You might be feeling baby's movements now - like butterflies in your tummy. But it could still be a few weeks, so don't worry. Emotions in pregnancy Pregnancy is a time when emotions can change. If you've had depression in the past or you're feeling sad and not enjoying life the way you used to, tell your doctor or midwife.
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Pregnancy

15 weeks pregnant

You at 15 weeks pregnant Your body is circulating about 20% more blood than usual. Your heart is working harder. This might give you a pregnancy 'glow', along with a few side effects: higher or lower blood pressure nose and gum bleeds headaches. Your hair might also be getting thicker, and your nails could be growing faster.
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Pregnancy

13 weeks pregnant

You at 13 weeks pregnant Welcome to the second trimester! Your bump might be starting to show. You might also feel stretching around your groin and tummy. This is because the ligaments holding your uterus in place are starting to stretch. The veins in your breasts are becoming more visible. Sharing the news It's a good idea to talk with your partner about when and how you'd like to share the news with others.
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Pregnancy

27 weeks pregnant

You at 27 weeks pregnant You might start putting on a bit more weight. But remember that you don't need to 'eat for two'. The quality of food, not the quantity, is more important. Because women gain weight at different rates and times, talk with your midwife or doctor about the best amount of weight gain for you during pregnancy.
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