Category School Age

Building a relationship with your child's school
School Age

Building a relationship with your child's school

Benefits of a strong parent-school relationship As a parent, you know your child better than anyone else does. Your child's teachers will want to get to know him too. When you have a strong and respectful relationship with your child's school and teachers, you're in a good position to give them the information they need to help your child get the most out of his education.

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School Age

Language development: 5-8 years

Language development in children at 5-8 years: early literacy and language sounds By five years , children know that sounds make up words. They can identify words beginning with the same sound - for example, 'Mummy made magic marshmallows'. They can also spot words that rhyme. They might play rhyming games and sing out words that rhyme, like 'bat', 'cat', 'fat', 'hat' and 'mat'.
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School Age

Depression in children: 3-8 years

What is depression in children? It's normal for children to feel down, be cranky or think negatively - this is just part of growing up. Children have to go through a range of feelings to learn how to deal with them. But childhood depression is more than just feeling sad, blue or low . Depression in children is a serious illness, which can affect children's physical and mental health.
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School Age

Using consequences in behaviour management

About consequences A consequence is something that happens after your child behaves in a particular way . A consequence can be positive or negative. There are times when you might choose to use negative consequences for difficult behaviour. For example, you can use negative consequences to enforce limits and reinforce rules when simple reminders haven't worked.
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School Age

School-age bullying: helping your child

Bullying at school Bullying can be devastating for children's confidence and self-esteem. If your child is being bullied, she needs lots of guidance, love and support, both at home and wherever the bullying is happening. Your child also needs to know that you'll take action to prevent any further bullying.
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School Age

Australian Early Development Census (AEDC)

What is the Australian Early Development Census (AEDC)? The Australian Early Development Census (AEDC) collects information about how Australian children are developing in all the different communities across Australia. The Australian Early Development Census looks at five key areas of child development : physical health and wellbeing - how fit and well our children are social competence - the skills our children use to get along with others emotional maturity - how our children handle their feelings language skills and cognitive skills (school based) - the skills our children use to speak, understand and think, based on the types of educational activities they do at school communication skills and general knowledge - what our children know, and all the different ways they communicate this.
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School Age

Carrot and oat mini muffins

Makes 24 Preparation time : 15 minutes Cooking time : 15 minutes 150 gm wholemeal flour 150 gm plain rolled oats 180 gm carrots, grated (about 2 medium carrots) 70 gm honey or brown sugar (do not use honey if making for children under 12 months old) ½ tsp. cinnamon 2 eggs 100 ml olive oil Preheat oven to 180°C.
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School Age

Physical activity for school-age children

Everyday physical activity for school-age children Most primary school-age children still need plenty of unstructured activity like running and chasing, and playground games. Everyday physical activity can also include walking, riding bikes or scooters around your neighbourhood, and playing outside in your backyard or local park.
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School Age

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in children and teenagers

What are obsessions? Obsessions are thoughts, images or urges that a child doesn't want but can't get out of his head. When a child has these thoughts, he might also feel very anxious or fearful. Some examples of obsessions might be: imagining loved ones getting hurt being scared of getting sick from touching dirty handles feeling that something terrible will happen if your books aren't in the right order.
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School Age

School-age creative learning and development: ideas and activities

Encouraging your school-age child's creative play It's important for your child to enjoy and think about the process of creating things. You can help this happen by encouraging your child to share artworks and creative activities with you and your family. When your child is creating something, it's good for him to keep experimenting and changing his artworks until he feels they're finished.
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School Age

Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD): children 5-12 years

What is oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)? Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is a childhood behaviour problem. A child with ODD: won't do what people ask thinks that what she's being asked to do is unreasonable gets angry and aggressive about being asked to do things. All children are disobedient and cranky sometimes, especially if they're tired, upset or frustrated.
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School Age

Sport: helping children enjoy it more

Skill development Sometimes children don't have all the physical skills they need for some sports or organised physical activities like gymnastics, athletics and martial arts. They might not be able to run, jump, catch or throw as well as other children. If this sounds like your child, you could help her practise at home , at the park or with family and friends.
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School Age

Barbecue beef wraps

Serves 4 (2 adults and 2 children) Preparation time : 10 mins Cooking time : 10 mins 1 tablespoon olive oil or canola oil 350 gm rump steak, thinly sliced across the grain (to keep the meat tender) 1 Spanish (red) onion, halved and thinly sliced 1 red capsicum, halved, deseeded and sliced 100 gm snow peas, sliced 2 tablespoons barbeque sauce 1 avocado, halved, deseeded and sliced 335 gm packet wholemeal or multigrain wraps Heat a large frying pan over high heat.
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School Age

6-8 years: child development

Child development at 6-8 years: what's happening Playing and learning Your child's play is complex now, and he often plays out ideas he's come across at school or in the media. For example, you might find yourself serving dinner to a scuba diver, a rock star - or maybe even the Prime Minister! Because your child is better at controlling her own behaviour and emotions, she also copes better with games that involve rules, as well as winning, losing and playing fair.
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School Age

Good mental health for children: 3-8 years

Children's mental health: what is it? Mental health is the way children think or feel about themselves and the world around them. It's related to how children cope with life's challenges and stresses. What good mental health in children looks like Children with good mental health: feel happy and positive about themselves enjoy life learn well have healthy relationships with family and friends can manage sad, worrying or angry feelings can bounce back from tough times.
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School Age

School-age behaviour: what to expect

Children's behaviour in the school years School-age children often love to be independent , but they still need your love, attention and approval. Your child also needs limits that guide her as she grows and explores. These limits help your child feel both secure and ready for the new rules, routines and responsibilities that come with starting school.
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School Age

Thinking and play: school-age children

About play and cognitive development for school-age children School-age children can absorb new information quickly and are excited by learning . Although your child is learning in more formal ways now, play is still one of the main ways that school-age children develop skills to think, understand, communicate, remember, imagine and predict.
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School Age

Emotions and play: school-age children

School-age kids, emotions and play School-age children start putting into action all the things they've learned about feelings in their early years. For example, managing emotions and expressing them in appropriate ways are important parts of making friends at school and learning in a classroom. Play is still one of the main ways that children explore feelings and practise how to express and manage them.
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School Age

Lamb and mint jelly cutlets with peas

Serves 4 Preparation : 5 mins Cooking time : 15-20 mins 8 lamb cutlets 2 tablespoons mint jelly 2 large potatoes 1 tablespoon butter or olive oil ¼ cup low-fat milk 1 cup frozen peas Heat a frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook lamb cutlets for 3 minutes each side. Turn off heat, and spread cutlets with mint jelly while still hot.
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