Category Teens

Trauma: first response to help children
Teens

Trauma: first response to help children

How children might react to traumatic events If your child experiences a traumatic event, he might feel frightened or distressed. Children's reactions to traumatic events depend on a few things - how old they are, whether they've been through a traumatic event before, and what kind of support they get from family, friends and school.

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Teens

When teenagers break the rules: options

Scenario: teenagers breaking the rules In this scenario, Sue breaks the rules by coming home late from school. Different things might happen depending on how Sue's mum responds to this behaviour. Option 1: let it go When teenagers break the rules, you could respond by letting your child's behaviour go.
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Teens

Discipline strategies for teenagers

Teenage discipline: the basics Discipline isn't about punishment. It's about guiding children towards appropriate ways to behave. For teenagers, discipline is about agreeing on and setting appropriate limits and helping them behave within those limits. When your child was younger, you probably used a range of discipline strategies to teach him the basics of good behaviour.
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Teens

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): 5-15 years

What is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? If children have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), it means they have difficulties with: paying attention - for example, they find it hard to concentrate on tasks being hyperactive - for example, they find it hard to sit still for long controlling impulses - for example, they might do things before thinking them through.
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Teens

Risky behaviour in teenagers: how to handle it

Risky behaviour: why teenagers do it It's normal for teenagers to want new experiences - although it can be stressful for you as a parent. Teenagers need to explore their own limits and abilities, as well as the boundaries you set. They also need to express themselves as individuals. It's all part of their path to becoming independent young adults , with their own identities.
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Teens

Disrespectful teenage behaviour: how to deal with it

About disrespectful behaviour in teenagers Sometimes you might feel that interactions with your child all seem a bit like this: You - 'How's that project going?' Your child - 'Why are you checking up on me? Don't you trust me? I always get good marks, so why ask me about it?' You - 'I was only asking.
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Teens

Gambling and teenagers

Where, how and when children and teenagers gamble You might think it's too early to think about your child and gambling. After all, the legal age for gambling on the pokies, at the TAB or at a casino is 18 years. But some children start gambling very young - as young as 10 years. Most children have gambled by the age of 15.
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Teens

Teenage behaviour and how to manage it

Teenage behaviour: what to expect and why As part of growing up and becoming independent, your child needs to test out independent ideas and ways of behaving . Sometimes this involves disagreeing with you, giving you a bit of 'attitude', pushing the limits and boundaries you set, wanting to be more like friends and even taking risks.
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Teens

Managing ADHD: teenagers 12-18 years

Worried your child has ADHD: first steps If you think your child might have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the first step is to visit your child's GP or paediatrician for an assessment. The assessment will look at a range of causes for your child's difficulties. If your child is diagnosed with ADHD, you and your health professional will work together to develop a behaviour management plan.
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Teens

Teenagers in trouble

Teenage behaviour: what's normal In adolescence, teenagers go through a lot of: physical changes social and emotional changes brain-based changes. As teenagers go through these changes, you might see some disrespect and rudeness, risk-taking, a desire for more privacy, more interest in friends and less interest in family, and a new interest in romantic relationships and physical or sexual relationships.
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Teens

Parents: role models and positive influences for teenagers

Parents as role models for teenagers When your child was younger, your role was to lay the foundations for his behaviour. For example, you probably showed your child how to cooperate and take turns with others. Now your child is in his teens, he can start taking responsibility for his own behaviour. But you're still an important role model.
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Teens

Your teenage child bullying others: what to do

What does teenage bullying look like? Bullying is when your child deliberately and repeatedly upsets, frightens, threatens or hurts someone or someone's property, reputation or social status. Bullying can be: verbal bullying - for example, insulting, threatening or making fun of someone bullying behind someone's back - for example, playing nasty jokes, spreading rumours, or encouraging peers to exclude someone physical bullying - for example, pushing, tripping or hitting, or damaging property cyberbullying - using digital technology to deliberately harass or humiliate.
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Teens

'Frenemies' and toxic friendships

Frenemies and toxic friendships: what you need to know Teenage friendships can sometimes turn 'toxic'. Or sometimes toxic friendships can develop if your child hangs out with 'frenemies' - teenagers who are mean to her. Instead of making your child feel good - like he belongs and is accepted - toxic friendships can lead to your child having negative feelings about himself or others.
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Teens

Teenage bullying: what to look for and how to help

What is bullying? Bullying is when someone deliberately and repeatedly upsets, frightens, threatens or hurts someone else or their property, reputation or social status. Bullying can be: verbal bullying - for example, insulting, threatening or making fun of someone bullying behind someone's back - for example, playing nasty jokes, spreading rumours, or encouraging peers to exclude someone physical bullying - for example, pushing, tripping or hitting, or damaging property cyberbullying - using digital technology to deliberately harass or humiliate.
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Teens

Hosting a teenage party: guide for parents

Hosting a teenage party There might be times when your child wants to host a party at home. Hosting a party can feel daunting - you might be worried about loud music, gatecrashing, property damage or alcohol use. But with the right planning, hosting a party can be a fun thing to do with your child. Your child will get to practise her planning skills, develop responsibility and learn about decision-making.
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Teens

Cyberbullying: spotting the signs and helping your child

Cyberbullying: how to spot the signs Cyberbullying can be tough to spot. This is because many young people who are being bullied might not realise what's happening at first. Also, they sometimes don't want to tell teachers or parents, perhaps because they feel embarrassed. They might be scared that it'll get worse if an adult tries to do something about it, or they might be worried about losing their computer or mobile phone privileges.
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Teens

Peer pressure and influence: teenagers

Peer influence and peer pressure Peer influence is when you choose to do something you wouldn't otherwise do, because you want to feel accepted and valued by your friends. It isn't just or always about doing something against your will. You might hear the term 'peer pressure' used a lot. But peer influence is a better way to describe how teenagers' behaviour is shaped by wanting to feel they belong to a group of friends or peers.
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Teens

Encouraging good behaviour in teenagers: 20 tips

1. Take time to actively listen Actively listening means paying close attention to what your child is saying and feeling, rather than thinking of what you want to say next. This shows your child that you care and that you're interested. 2. Set clear rules about behaviour Family rules make expectations about behaviour clear.
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Teens

Teenagers and youth subcultures

Youth subcultures: what you need to know Belonging to a social group or youth subculture is often about exploring who you are and what you stand for. During adolescence, teenagers strive to form independent adult identities. Experimenting with different social groups is one way of doing this. It's how your child can test out being someone new - someone separate from your family.
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Teens

Teenage communicating and relationships: overview

Family relationships in the teenage years Family relationships change during adolescence, but they tend to stay strong. In fact, your child needs your family's love and support as much as she did when she was younger. At the same time, your child will want more privacy and more personal space as he gets older.
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Teens

Praise, encouragement and rewards

Praise How praise works Praise is when you tell your child what you like about her or her behaviour. Praise nurtures your child's self-esteem, confidence and sense of self. By using praise, you're showing your child how to think and talk positively about himself. You're helping your child learn how to recognise when he does well and to pat himself on the back.
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